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Six fundamentals of effective nanny hiring

Published on January 14, 2018

Looking to hire a nanny? Feel like you’ll be navigating a world of unspoken rules, expectations, and dynamics?

We’ve rounded up the basics of what to do and what not to do when hiring a caregiver. Take a look.

1. Define the role and expectations:

Do you want someone that just stays at your home and watches your child(ren) or do you want someone who takes them to the park and drives them to music lessons? Will the nanny be expected to cook meals and do the laundry as well?

2. You pay your nanny to take care of your kid:

Your nanny is your employee. And while she may really like her job and your baby, she will leave if you stop paying her. So ask questions, remain objective, don’t worry about being intrusive and forget about making yourself likable. And don’t hire out of sympathy or guilt. At the end of the day, it’s your baby and your home, so be tough.

3. Ask open-ended questions:

Here are few examples. What do you do when a child has a temper tantrum? What are some of your favorite activities to do with infants/toddlers? What type of discipline techniques have you used? How did you handle an injury with a child under your care? Ask about her childhood, her parents, her relationships, social life, etc.

4. State your values clearly:

Most nannies are happy to adapt to the values of the family they’re caring for. However, it’s best to state what your values are during the interview process to avoid future disagreements. You may have certain values that you want to teach your children such as independence. It’s important to communicate your values during the hiring process in order to maintain personal and professional integrity.

5. Experience is key:

What kind of experience does your potential nanny have with childcare? Has this person actually been paid to care for a child before? Consider this before hiring.

6. Conduct a reference check:

Ask for a list of past employers. Call them. Fire away questions. Here are few examples. When did she start working for you? What was the age of your child(ren)? What did you like most about her? What were her drawbacks? Was she dependable? How did she handle a crisis situation? Why did she leave? Would you rehire her?

 

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